Juror Services

Jury Service Update:

For Jury term 09/18-09/20: All Jury Trials have been canceled. This concludes your Jury service. Thank you. 

Your job as a juror


Jurors play a vital role in the American justice system. The protection of our rights and liberties is largely achieved through the teamwork of judge and jury who, working together in common effort, put into practice the principles of freedom. The judge determines the law to be applied in the case while the jury decides the facts. Like the privilege of voting, jury duty is one significant way we can take part in the democratic process. We rely on jurors for the protection of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

You do not need special knowledge or ability to do your job as a juror. Keep an open mind, use common sense, concentrate on the evidence presented, and be fair and honest in your deliberations.

Remember, do not be influenced by sympathy or prejudice. It is vital that you be impartial with regard to all testimony and ideas presented at the trial.

We hope you find your experience as a juror interesting and satisfying. Thank you for your willingness to serve!

What to wear


Dress comfortably. Suits, ties and other, more formal wear are not necessary. 

Not appropriate for court:
  • beach wear
  • shorts
  • halter or tank tops 
  • hats, unless worn for religious purposes.

What to bring

You are encouraged to bring reading materials, crossword puzzles, work, etc. WiFi is provided along with several charging outlets. Jurors have access to a small kitchen with a microwave and refrigerator. You may bring your own food from home or leave during the lunch break to get food nearby the courthouse.

Unable to report?


Because your absence could delay a trial, it is important that you report each day you are required to. If a real emergency occurs - a sudden illness, accident or death in the family - tell the court staff immediately so that the trial can be scheduled around you.

Call 425-487-5587 to report your absence.

Employer notice


Washington law says employers, “shall provide an employee with sufficient leave of absence from employment when that employee is summoned” for jury duty. It also says employers, “shall not deprive an employee of employment or threaten, coerce, or harass an employee or deny an employee promotional opportunities” for serving as a juror. It does not say your employer has to pay you while you serve.